Syllabus - Department of Food Engineering | İzmir University of Economics

FACULTY OF ENGINEERING

Department of Food Engineering

VCD 302 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Analysis of Visual Culture
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
VCD 302
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
4

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Service Course
Course Level
First Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives The overall aims of this course are: • to analyse and interpret the increasing visualisation of contemporary culture • to develop specific visual and verbal skills for observing, analysing, describing and critiquing (audio)visual imagery from a range of diverse theoretical perspectives. • to interrogate the ways visual images contribute to the formation of identities and social environments.
Learning Outcomes The students who succeeded in this course;
  • will be able to classify/categorize different types of signs in visual sources
  • will be able to explain the differences between icons, indexes and symbols
  • will be able to analyze visual culture with a set of methodological approaches that can be applied to the study of visual culture
  • will be able to demonstrate a basic knowledge of theoretical tools
  • will be able to critically analyze a visual source using a variety of criteria including: the social context in which it was created; the cultural meanings it embodies; the style of the work, and the intentions of the artist/designer
Course Description This is a theoretical course that explores the meanings and effects of images, and ways of looking across a wide spectrum of visual culture: from painting and sculpture to print, packaging, photography, film, advertising, video games and fashion. It encourages students to develop a range of critical approaches to visual language and its importance both historically and contemporary. The course will thus touch upon a number of significant issues, such as globalization, postmodernism, sexuality and the construction of gender, commodification and mass consumption/production, and the production and reception of images of ethnicity and national identity.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Syllabus Introduction None
2 What is Visual Culture? Visual Methodologies (I) Rose, G. Visual Methodologies. London: Sage, 2007 (Chapter 3: ‘the good eye‘)
3 What is Visual Culture? Visual Methodologies (I) Rose, G. Visual Methodologies. London: Sage, 2007 (Chapter 4: ‘Content analysis’)
4 What is a Sign? Visual Methodologies (II) Williamson, J. De-coding Advertise-ments: Ideology and Meaning in Advertising. Lon-don: Boyars, 1978, pp. 1114, 1727, 99105. Rose, G. Visual Methodologies. London: Sage, 2007 (Chapter 5, ‘Semiology’)
5 Mythology and Second-order semiological system. Rose, G. Visual Methodologies. London: Sage, 2007 (Chapter 5, ‘Semiology’)
6 Visual Methodologies (III) Psychoanalysis’ in Rose G. Visual Methodologies. London: Sage, 2007
7 Visualising Gender: Constructions of Femininity and Masculinity ’Psychoanalysis’ in Rose G. Visual Methodologies. London: Sage, 2007,
8 Critique, discussion,writing the in-class essay None
9 Postmodernism: Pastiche and Parody Postmodernism and Popular Culture’. Practices of Looking. M. Sturken, et. al, Oxford: OUP
10 In-class presentations by students None
11 Introduction to Discourse Analysis Discourse Analysis I in Rose G. Visual Methodologies. London: Sage, 2007
12 Visual Power: The Panopticon ‘Over and Under Surveillance’ online article by Judy Chen
13 Introduction to Contemporary Art Theory The Conspiracy of Art: Manifestos, Interviews,Essays’ by Jean Baudrillard, NY,2005
14 Fashion and Identity Barthes, R. The Fashion System. Berkeley and Los Angeles, California: University of California Press, 1990
15 Review of the Semester  
16 Review of the Semester  

 

Course Notes/Textbooks

Gillian Rose ''Visual Methodologies'' ISBN: 978-1-4739-4890-7

Suggested Readings/Materials

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
1
40
Homework / Assignments
1
40
Presentation / Jury
Project
1
20
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exams
Midterm
Final Exam
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
60
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
40
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Theoretical Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
0
Study Hours Out of Class
0
Field Work
0
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
1
20
20
Homework / Assignments
1
20
20
Presentation / Jury
0
Project
1
20
20
Seminar / Workshop
0
Oral Exam
0
Midterms
0
Final Exam
0
    Total
108

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1 Being able to transfer knowledge and skills acquired in mathematics and science into engineering,
2 Being able to identify and solve problem areas related to Food Engineering,
3 Being able to design projects and production systems related to Food Engineering, gather data, analyze them and utilize their outcomes in practice,
4

Having the necessary skills to develop  and use  novel technologies and equipment in the field of food engineering,

5

Being able to take part actively in team work, express his/her ideas freely, make efficient decisions as well as working individually,

6

Being able to follow universal developments and innovations, improve himself/herself continuously and have an awareness to enhance the quality,

7

Having professional and ethical awareness,

8 Being aware of universal issues such as environment, health, occupational safety in solving problems related to Food Engineering,
9

Being able to apply entrepreneurship, innovativeness and sustainability in the profession,

10

Being able to use software programs in Food Engineering and have the necessary knowledge and skills to use information and communication technologies that may be encountered in practice (European Computer Driving License, Advanced Level),

11

Being able to gather information about food engineering and communicate with colleagues using a foreign language ("European Language Portfolio Global Scale", Level B1)

12

Being able to speak a second foreign language at intermediate level.

13

Being able to relate the knowledge accumulated during the history of humanity to the field of expertise

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest

 


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